• Overview
  • Obesity prevalence
  • Trends over time
  • Population breakdowns
  • Drivers
  • Comorbidities
  • Health systems
  • Actions
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Obesity prevalence

Adults, 2016-2017

Survey type:Measured
Age:15+
Sample size:6233
Area covered:National
References:Encuesta Nacional de Salud. Chile. 2016-2017 https://www.minsal.cl/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ENS-2016-17_PRIMEROS-RESULTADOS.pdf (Last accessed 04.08.20)
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Adults, 2009-2010

Survey type:Measured
Age:15+
Sample size:5416
Area covered:National
References:Encuesta Nacional de Salud. Chile. 2009-2010. https://www.minsal.cl/portal/url/item/bcb03d7bc28b64dfe040010165012d23.pdf (Last accessed 04.08.20)
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Adults, 2003

Survey type:Measured
Age:17+
Sample size:3619
Area covered:National
References:2003 ENS Report. Final results on the National Health Survey. Http://epi.minsal.cl/epi/html/invest/ENS/informeFinalENS.pdf.
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Adults, 1992

Survey type:Measured
Age:15+
Sample size:Not specified
References:Uauy R, Albal C, Kain J. Obesity Trends in Latin America: Transiting from Under-to Overweight. Journal of Nutrition 2001;131:S893-S899
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Adults, 1988

Survey type:Measured
Age:15+
Sample size:Not specified
References:Berrios X, Jadue I, Zenteno J, Ross MI, Rodriguez H. Prevalencia de factores de riesgo para enfermedades cronicas. Estudio de la poblacion general de la region Metropolitana, 1986-1987. Rev. Med. Chile. 1990;118:597-604
Notes:Urban population
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Children, 2013

Survey type:Self-reported
Age:13-17
Sample size:2049
Area covered:National
References:Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS), Fact Sheet available at https://www.who.int/ncds/surveillance/gshs/2013_Chile_GSHS_fact_sheet.pdf
Notes:WHO cutoffs.
Cutoffs:WHO

Children, 2002

Survey type:Measured
Age:6
Sample size:17080 (4-6 year olds)
Area covered:National
References:Kain J, Uauy R, Vio F and Albana. 2002. Trends of overwieght and obesity prevalence in Chilean children: comparism of three definitions. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 56: 200 - 204.
Notes:IOTF Cut off. Reference: Cole TJ, Bellizzi MC, Flegal KM, Dietz WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: International survey. BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-3.
Cutoffs:IOTF

Children, 2000

Survey type:Measured
Age:6
Sample size:199444
References:Kain J, Uauy R, Vio F, Albala C. Trends in overweight and obesity prevalence in Chilean children: comparison of three definitions. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2002;56:200-204
Notes:IOTF Cut off. Reference: Cole TJ, Bellizzi MC, Flegal KM, Dietz WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: International survey. BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-3.
Cutoffs:IOTF

Children, 1990

Survey type:Measured
Age:6
Sample size:Not specified
References:Kain J, Uauy R, Vio F, Albala C. Trends in overweight and obesity prevalence in Chilean children: comparison of three definitions. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2002;56:200-204
Notes:IOTF Cut off. Reference: Cole TJ, Bellizzi MC, Flegal KM, Dietz WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: International survey. BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-3.
Cutoffs:IOTF

Children, 1987

Survey type:Measured
Age:6
Sample size:166891
References:Kain J, Uauy R, Vio F, Albala C. Trends in overweight and obesity prevalence in Chilean children: comparison of three definitions. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2002;56:200-204
Notes:IOTF Cut off. Reference: Cole TJ, Bellizzi MC, Flegal KM, Dietz WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: International survey. BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-3.
Cutoffs:IOTF

Overweight/obesity by education

Adults, 2016-2017

Survey type:Measured
Age:15+
Sample size:6233
Area covered:National
References:Encuesta Nacional de Salud. Chile. 2016-2017 https://www.minsal.cl/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ENS-2016-17_PRIMEROS-RESULTADOS.pdf (Last accessed 04.08.20)
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Overweight/obesity by age

Adults, 2016-2017

Survey type:Measured
Sample size:6233
Area covered:National
References:Encuesta Nacional de Salud. Chile. 2016-2017 https://www.minsal.cl/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ENS-2016-17_PRIMEROS-RESULTADOS.pdf (Last accessed 04.08.20)
Unless otherwise noted, overweight refers to a BMI between 25kg and 29.9kg/m², obesity refers to a BMI greater than 30kg/m².

Insufficient physical activity

Adults, 2016

References:Guthold R, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Bull FC. Worldwide trends in insufficient physical activity from 2001 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 358 population-based surveys with 1.9 million participants. Lancet 2018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30357-7

Men, 2016

References:Guthold R, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Bull FC. Worldwide trends in insufficient physical activity from 2001 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 358 population-based surveys with 1.9 million participants. Lancet 2018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30357-7

Women, 2016

References:Guthold R, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Bull FC. Worldwide trends in insufficient physical activity from 2001 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 358 population-based surveys with 1.9 million participants. Lancet 2018 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(18)30357-7

Children, 2010

Age:11-17
References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A893?lang=en
Notes:% of school going adolescents not meeting WHO recommendations on Physical Activity for Health, i.e. doing less than 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.
Definitions:% Adolescents insufficiently active (age standardised estimate)

Boys, 2010

Age:11-17
References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A893?lang=en
Notes:% of school going adolescents not meeting WHO recommendations on Physical Activity for Health, i.e. doing less than 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.
Definitions:% Adolescents insufficiently active (age standardised estimate)

Girls, 2010

Age:11-17
References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A893?lang=en
Notes:% of school going adolescents not meeting WHO recommendations on Physical Activity for Health, i.e. doing less than 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.
Definitions:% Adolescents insufficiently active (age standardised estimate)

Average daily frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption

Children, 2009-2015

Survey type:Measured
Age:12-17
References:Beal et al. (2019). Global Patterns of Adolescent Fruit, Vegetable, Carbonated Soft Drink, and Fast-food consumption: A meta-analysis of global school-based student health surveys. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1177/0379572119848287 sourced from Food Systems Dashboard http://www.foodsystemsdashboard.org/food-system

Estimated per-capita fruit intake

Adults, 2017

Survey type:Measured
Age:25+
References:Global Burden of Disease, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation http://ghdx.healthdata.org/
Definitions:Estimated per-capita fruit intake (g/day)

Prevalence of less-than-daily fruit consumption

Children, 2009-2015

Survey type:Measured
Age:12-17
References:Global School-based Student Health Surveys. Beal et al (2019). Global Patterns of Adolescent Fruit, Vegetable, Carbonated Soft Drink, and Fast-food consumption: A meta-analysis of global school-based student health surveys. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1177/0379572119848287. Sourced from Food Systems Dashboard http://www.foodsystemsdashboard.org/food-system
Definitions:Prevalence of less-than-daily fruit consumption (% less-than-daily fruit consumption)

Prevalence of less-than-daily vegetable consumption

Children, 2009-2015

Survey type:Measured
Age:12-17
References:Beal et al. (2019). Global Patterns of Adolescent Fruit, Vegetable, Carbonated Soft Drink, and Fast-food consumption: A meta-analysis of global school-based student health surveys. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1177/0379572119848287 sourced from Food Systems Dashboard http://www.foodsystemsdashboard.org/food-system
Definitions:Prevalence of less-than-daily vegetable consumption (% less-than-daily vegetable consumption)

Average weekly frequency of fast food consumption

Children, 2009-2015

Age:12-17
References:Beal et al. (2019). Global Patterns of Adolescent Fruit, Vegetable, Carbonated Soft Drink, and Fast-food consumption: A meta-analysis of global school-based student health surveys. Food and Nutrition Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1177/0379572119848287 sourced from Food Systems Dashboard http://www.foodsystemsdashboard.org/food-system

Estimated per-capita processed meat intake

Adults, 2017

Survey type:Measured
Age:25+
References:Global Burden of Disease, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation http://ghdx.healthdata.org/
Definitions:Estimated per-capita processed meat intake (g per day)

Estimated per-capita whole grains intake

Adults, 2017

Survey type:Measured
Age:25+
References:Global Burden of Disease, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation http://ghdx.healthdata.org/
Definitions:Estimated per-capita whole grains intake (g/day)

Mental health - depression disorders

Adults, 2015

References:Prevalence data from Global Burden of Disease study 2015 (http://ghdx.healthdata.org) published in: Depression and Other Common Mental Disorders: Global Health Estimates. Geneva:World Health Organization; 2017. Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.
Definitions:% of population with depression disorders

Mental health - anxiety disorders

Adults, 2015

References:Prevalence data from Global Burden of Disease study 2015 (http://ghdx.healthdata.org) published in: Depression and Other Common Mental Disorders: Global Health Estimates. Geneva:World Health Organization; 2017. Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.
Definitions:% of population with anxiety disorders

Oesophageal cancer

Men, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, oesophagus, adults ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, oesophagus, adults ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Breast cancer

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, breast, females, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Colorectal cancer

Men, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, colorectum, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, colorectum, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Pancreatic cancer

Men, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, pancreas, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, pancreas, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Gallbladder cancer

Men, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, gallbladder, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, gallbladder, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Kidney cancer

Men, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, kidney, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, kidney, adults, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Cancer of the uterus

Women, 2018

Age:20+
References:Global Cancer Observatory, Cancer incidence rates http://gco.iarc.fr/ (last accessed 30th June 2020)
Definitions:Estimated age-standardized incidence rates (World) in 2018, cervix uteri, females, ages 20+. ASR (World) per 100,000

Raised blood pressure

Adults, 2015

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A875?lang=en
Definitions:Age Standardised estimated % Raised blood pressure 2015 (SBP>=140 OR DBP>=90).

Men, 2015

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A875?lang=en
Definitions:Age Standardised estimated % Raised blood pressure 2015 (SBP>=140 OR DBP>=90).

Women, 2015

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A875?lang=en
Definitions:Age Standardised estimated % Raised blood pressure 2015 (SBP>=140 OR DBP>=90).

Raised cholesterol

Adults, 2008

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A885
Definitions:% Raised total cholesterol (>= 5.0 mmol/L) (age-standardized estimate).

Men, 2008

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A885
Definitions:% Raised total cholesterol (>= 5.0 mmol/L) (age-standardized estimate).

Women, 2008

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A885
Definitions:% Raised total cholesterol (>= 5.0 mmol/L) (age-standardized estimate).

Raised fasting blood glucose

Men, 2014-2019

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A869?lang=en
Definitions:Age Standardised % raised fasting blood glucose (>= 7.0 mmol/L or on medication).

Women, 2014-2019

References:Global Health Observatory data repository, World Health Organisation, http://apps.who.int/gho/data/node.main.A869?lang=en
Definitions:Age Standardised % raised fasting blood glucose (>= 7.0 mmol/L or on medication).

Diabetes prevalence

Adults, 2017

References:Reproduced with kind permission of IDF, International Diabetes Federation. IDF Diabetes Atlas, 8th edition. Brussels, Belgium: International Diabetes Federation, 2017. http://www.diabetesatlas.org
Definitions:Diabetes age-adjusted comparative prevalence (%).

Health systems

Economic classification: High Income

Health systems summary

Chile has a mixed public/private health insurance system that together provides universal health coverage. All workers must use 7% of their income to pay for health insurance but individuals can choose to contribute to the public insurance provided by Fondo Nacional de Salud or to private insurance provided by Instituciones de Salud Previsional. Coverage under the two types of insurance are not identical, there are differences between and within them and this is often based on contribution (and therefore an individual’s income). Approximately 78% of the population is covered by public insurance, including most of the rural and urban poor and retirees. On the other hand, private insurers covers a smaller but wealthier segment of the population, creating inequality in risk pooling between the two insurance types.

General taxation and out of pocket expenditure are used to supplement the insurances. Out of pocket expenditure remains high (at approximately 38% of total health expenditure), so financial protection in Chile is considered to be poor.

Indicators

Where is the country’s government in the journey towards defining ‘Obesity as a disease’?Some progress
Where is the country’s healthcare provider in the journey towards defining ‘Obesity as a disease’?No
Is there specialist training available dedicated to the training of health professionals to prevent, diagnose, treat and manage obesity?No
Have any taxes or subsidies been put in place to protect/assist/inform the population around obesity?Yes
Are there adequate numbers of trained health professionals in specialties relevant to obesity in urban areas?Some progress
Are there adequate numbers of trained health professionals in specialties relevant to obesity in rural areas?No
Are there any obesity-specific recommendations or guidelines published for adults?No
Are there any obesity-specific recommendations or guidelines published for children?No
In practice, how is obesity treatment largely funded?Out of pocket

Perceived barriers to treatment

  • Lack of political will, interest and action
  • Poor health literacy and behaviour
  • Social determinants of health
  • Food cost and availability
  • Lack of financial investment and funding for coverage
  • Lack of opportunity for physical activity
  • Lack of training for healthcare professionals
  • High cost of out of pocket payments
  • Obesity not recognised as a disease
  • Lack of evidence, monitoring and research

Summary of stakeholder feedback

Stakeholders acknowledged that Chile has adopted and implemented a handful of initiatives and laws to address obesity, including regulations on the advertisement and labelling of foods and restricted access to unhealthy products in schools. Despite this, it was considered that efforts were insufficient and inefficient, with improved investment and a more intersectoral approach needed. In short, it was felt that although the government talked about obesity as an epidemic, it did not yet treat obesity as a disease.

Similarly, it was judged that healthcare providers too do not treatment obesity as a disease. Availability and coverage of obesity treatment was reported to be poor in both the public and private system as obesity is believed to be an aesthetic issue rather than a medical one. However, obesity treatment was considered to be better provided for in the private system as other ailments took priority in the public system and there were better trained professionals in the private system.

It was suggested that those with obesity would become eligible for treatment when their BMI was 30 kg/m² or above, with people entering the system via primary care in the public system and by going straight to a specialist in the private system. However, the few options in the public system, poor insurance coverage and long waiting lists mean that many fall out the system without receiving adequate treatment. The result is mass undertreatment of obesity in Chile.

Stakeholders noted that there are no guidelines or recommendations for obesity treatment for adults nor children, and obesity did not feature heavily in any non-communicable disease strategies. They also highlighted that there is limited to no specialist obesity training available for health professionals, with SCOPE seemingly the only notable option. The availability of suitably trained, qualified professionals was therefore considered limited in urban areas but worse in rural areas.

Based on interviews/survey returns from 8 stakeholders

Last updated: June 2020

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Actions

Using evidence-informed policies to tackle overweight and obesity in Chile

Overweight and obesity are a global epidemic with rates having risen to alarming levels in both developed and developing countries. Chile has been no exemption, with sharp increases in obesity prevalence, especially among school-age children. This paper describes the policy actions and strategies implemented to tackle this major public health concern in Chile over the last 10 years, and highlights the main challenges and nuances of the process. Chile has taken policy action that includes front-of-package labelling, advertising regulations, and school-food restrictions. New policies focus on the social determinants of health as they relate to food environments and people’s behavior. These actions are not only suitable to the current context in Chile, but are also supported by the best available scientific evidence. Moreover, the implementation of these policies has produced a broad debate involving public institutions and the food industry, with discussions issues ranging from property rights to trade barriers. Despite some differences among stakeholders, a valuable political consensus has been achieved, and several international organizations are eager to evaluate the impact of these pioneer initiatives in Latin America.

Categories:Health Effectiveness Reviews (obesity related)
Year(s):2017 (ongoing)
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Rodríguez Osiac L, Cofré C, Pizarro T, Mansilla C, Herrera CA, Burrows J, et al. Using evidence-informed policies to tackle overweight and obesity in Chile. Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública [Internet]. 2017 Dec 19 [cited 2020 Jul 22];41. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6645201/ ‌
Find out more:www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Linked document:Download linked document
References:Rodríguez Osiac L, Cofré C, Pizarro T, Mansilla C, Herrera CA, Burrows J, et al. Using evidence-informed policies to tackle overweight and obesity in Chile. Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública [Internet]. 2017 Dec 19 [cited 2020 Jul 22];41. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6645201/

Ley sobre impuesto a las ventas y servicios (Tax law for sales and services)

Law document No.825 updated on September 29th, 2014. Natural or artificial beverages, energized or hypertonic beverages, with syrups or any product replacing it, or that is used to prepare similar beverages, mineral water or water with added artificial colour, flavour or sweetener will have a 10% tax. If the beverage has more than 15g per 240 millilitres or an equivalent portion the tax is 18%.

Categories:Taxation/Subsidies on Food or Beverages or law relating to public health
Year(s):2015 (ongoing)
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Biblioteca Nacional del Congreso Nacional de Chile
Find out more:www.leychile.cl
Linked document:Download linked document
References:In Chile, Electronic Tickets Will Be Required Beginning in September [Internet]. Edicomgroup. Available from: https://www.edicomgroup.com/en_ES/news/14208-in-chile-electronic-tickets-will-be-required-beginning-in-september.html

Choose to Live Healthily" (Elige Vivir Sano)

This is an initiative of the Chilean First Lady in collaboration with government ministries. It promotes healthy eating, physical activity and healthy living. “Hoy empiezo a vivir sano” (Today I will start to live healthily) is the slogan of the 2020 communications campaign launched today by the Social and Family Development Minister, Sebastián Sichel, and the Executive Secretary of Elige Vivir Sano (Choose to live healthily), Daniela Godoy. The campaign will be aired on mainstream media and social networks. It seeks to motivate people to make small changes in their routines to adopt healthier habits and combat excess weight and obesity, conditions that currently affect seven out of ten people over 15 years old in Chile. The actions being promoted include cooking as a family, prioritizing fruits as a snack, going for a walk, playing with children. These actions are easy to carry out and can have a significant impact on the quality of family life.

Categories:Evidence of Nutritional or Health Strategy/ Guidelines/Policy/Action plan
Evidence of Physical Activity Guidelines/Policy
Evidence of Community Interventions/Campaign
Year(s):2013 (ongoing)
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Government of Chile
Find out more:www.gob.cl
Linked document:Download linked document
References:https://magnet.cl. Gob.cl [Internet]. Gobierno de Chile. Available from: https://www.gob.cl/

Dietary guidelines for the Chilean population

The aim of these guidelines is to help people to maintain a healthy weight, eat healthily and be physically active every day.

Categories:Evidence of Nutritional or Health Strategy/ Guidelines/Policy/Action plan
Year(s):2013 (ongoing)
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA) of the University of Chile
Find out more:www.fao.org
Linked document:Download linked document
References:Chile [Internet]. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Available from: http://www.fao.org/nutrition/education/food-dietary-guidelines/regions/countries/Chile/en#:~:text=Eat%20fresh%20vegetables%20and%20fruits

Law of Nutritional Composition of Food and Advertising

Framework legislation to help regulate food marketing to children. An evaluation of Chile’s Law of Food Labeling and Advertising on sugar-sweetened beverage purchases from 2015 to 2017: A before-and-after study

Categories (partial):Evidence of Marketing Guidelines/Policy
Labelling Regulation/Guidelines
Year(s):2012 (ongoing)
Target age group:Children
Organisation:Government
Find out more:journals.plos.org
Linked document:Download linked document
References:Taillie LS, Reyes M, Colchero MA, Popkin B, Corvalán C. An evaluation of Chile’s Law of Food Labeling and Advertising on sugar-sweetened beverage purchases from 2015 to 2017: A before-and-after study. Basu S, editor. PLOS Medicine. 2020 Feb 11;17(2):e1003015. ‌

EGO-Chile (Estrategeia Global Contra La Obesidad)

EGO-Chile is a national nutrition policy document which aims to promote new actions and strategies to help control overweight and obesity. It involves both the public and private sectors.

Categories:Evidence of Nutritional or Health Strategy/ Guidelines/Policy/Action plan
Categories (partial):Evidence of National Obesity Strategy/Policy or Action
Year(s):2006 (ongoing)
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Ministry of Health
Find out more:extranet.who.int
Linked document:Download linked document
References:‌“ESTRATEGIA GLOBAL CONTRA LA OBESIDAD: EGO CHILE” [Internet]. Available from: http://pam-chile.cl/evento/evento03/pre02d.pdf

"Healthy Life" programme

The Healthy Life programme of the Ministry of Health is a comprehensive and free treatment that seeks to reduce the risk factors of developing Type 2 Diabetes and Arterial Hypertension in people, through an intervention in eating habits and physical condition. The target population is children, adolescents, adults and postpartum women. A nutritional diagnosis of overweight or obesity makes you eligible.

Categories:Evidence of Multidisciplinary Intervention
Non-national obesity strategies
Target age group:Adults and children
Organisation:Ministry of Health
Find out more:ssms.cl

No actions could be found for the above criteria.

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